Milan 2013: Fuori Salone

Euroluce name in colours

This is the fifth of a series of posts to be published this week that will build up into our Handy Guide to Euroluce 2013. This one looks at what is happening in Milan itself at the same time. Other posts look at who is in halls nine, eleven, thirteen and fifteen — the main |Euroluce event at the Rho fairground. The last post in the series will pull all the content together into one document, with updates and corrections. This will then form the basis for our customary PDFs — alphabetical, and by hall — for you to use at the Fair. 

That last post in the series will remain up throughout the week of the Fair so that you can download the PDFs , or read it on your mobile thingy, at any time.

EUROLUCE MILAN 2013 – FUORI SALONE

The Milan Furniture Fair “fringe” is becoming as important as the Fairs themselves. Even if manufacturers are showing at the Fair, many also have a separate presence in Milan, where they may display more experimental things (one year, Foscarini did a display of their lights all in white, for example) and where they hold their parties.

Basically, they will intend their presence outwith the Fair to be more cool, and sometimes their products will be displayed in more relevant spaces. Baccarat chandeliers will probably look better in the Palazzo Morando, than on their stand in a big trade fair hall, for example.

You can end up walking quite a long way (and the forecast is for rain throughout the week this year) and then find an empty shop with many examples of one design artfully displayed – i.e. a total waste of time. In other cases, the Milan presence is in their own permanent showrooms, often allowing one to see more of the collection than was on the stand. Then there are companies who only show in Milan, rather than at the fair ground, so you won’t see what they are doing unless you track them down.

There is no way this summary can be complete – it relies on what we have been told. Always pick up the guide published by Interni magazine (there are others), of which there will be free copies at every destination, and at hotels, &c. There will also be banners outside participating locations.

I have grouped these entries by the main locations. There is a miscellaneous section at the end.

BRERA DISTRICT

Atelier Areti EDIT, La Pelota, Via Palermo 10 www.atelierareti.com

Innermost EDIT www.innermost.net

Kalmar EDIT www.kalmarlighting.com

EDIT’s web site: thedesignjunction.co.uk/milan

 

Lee Broom Spazio Pontaccio, Via Pontaccio 18 www.leebroom.com

Nendo Spazio Pontaccio     www.nendo.jp/en

Roll & Hill Spazio Pontaccio     www.rollandhill.com

Spazio Pontaccio’s web site:   www.spaziopontaccio.it


Foscarini Via Pontaccio 19 www.foscarini.com

Memphis Spazio Understate, Viale Francesco Crispi 5/b, corner of Via Varese store.memphis-milano.com

In spite of my pointing out for years that the products of the great period of Memphis – of Ettore Sottsass, Michele De Lucchi, Matteo Thun &c. – are still available, no client has ever expressed any interest whatsoever. Maybe that’s good thing – maybe their work still shocks and appals. Time, and exposure in books, museums, &c. has not made them desirable – even acceptable – to the mainstream. To see if you are mainstream, go and see the finest pieces from this collection. Cocktails at 19:00 on Friday.

Produzione Privata Via Varese 15 www.produzioneprivata.it

Exceptional pieces (by no means just lighting) from the exceptional architect/designer/artist, Michele De Lucchi. Creating his “private production” out of his studio enables him to work with fine craftspeople and materials. He only ever show on the ground floor of the studio, so this is an essential destination.

Corso Como 10 Corso Como 10 www.10corsocomo.com

One hardly needs an excuse to visit this concept store, but there is a compelling one anyway this year – an Angelo Mangiarotti retrospective. (He designed the iconic – and much copied – Giogali system for Vistosi, made up a glass hooks.)

SAN BABILA Metro M1

This metro station is selected as the hub out from which runs the luxury shopping streets of Via Monte Napoleone, Via Della Spiga, &c. plus the lighting shopping street of Corso Monforte.

Aqua Creations Boutique Mimí, Via Gesù 3 www.aquagallery.com

Artemide showroom, Corso Monforte 19 www.artemide.it

Baccarat Palazzo Morando, Via Sant’Andrea 6 int.baccarat.com/Lighting/lighting,en,sc.html

Barovier & Toso showroom, Via Durini 5, also: Russki Dom, Palazzo Visconti, Via Cino del Duca 8       www.barovier.com

EOQ Entratalibera, Corso Independenza 16 (go to the end of Corso Monforte. Corso Independenza splits: Entratalibera is on the south side) www.eoq-design.com

A young company producing excellent designs by Michael Young, using very high quality production facilities that normally make delicate aluminium pieces – e.g. fascias for technical equipment. Simple, elegant, clean – and colourful (Oh no. I shouldn’t have said colourful…. You’ll not go now.)

Flos showroom, Corso Monforte 9 www.flos.com

Ingo Maurer Spazio Krizia, Via Manin 21 (a bit of a walk, round the park, but essential – you’ll be surprised, delighted…)  www.ingo-maurer.com

Lindsey Adelman Nilufar, Via della Spiga 32 www.lindseyadelman.comThe web site of Nilufar, an important destination in its own right, is www.nilufar.com

Luceplan showroom, Corso Monforte 7 www.luceplan.com

Venini showroom, Via Monte Napoleone 9 www.venini.com

ZONA TORTONA to avoid that terrible bridge, go to Metro Sant’Agostino (M2), cross the big road, and walk down the south side of the little park.

David Trubridge Superstudiopiu’   www.davidtrubridge.com

We have been thrilled to see the increasing levels of awareness and appreciation of David’s work. There is a higher proportion of pieces available in kit form, which dramatically reduces the shipping costs (bearing in mind that he is based in New Zealand). They are as environmentally sound as they look. There is also a playfulness, and an elegance, the sense of the sea…. Plus the virtues of wood – no wonder he is so popular in Scandinavia. By the way, his works are now in our LIGHT FINDER.

Superstudiopiu’ web site: http://www.superstudiogroup.com

Lasvit Via Gaspare Bugatti 15 www.lasvit.com

Moooi Via Savona 56 www.moooi.com

1700 sq m housing their “special welcome”…

Contemporary Japanese Design Via Volhera 4 www.c-japandesign.net

VENTURA LAMBRATE go to Metro Lambrate (M2), then cross the railway tracks.

Catellani & Smith Casa della Luce, Via Ventura 5 www.catellanismith.com

 

Woka Vienna Design Week, Via Privata Oslavia 17 www.woka.at

Lobmeyr Vienna Design Week www.lobmeyr.at

Vienna Design Week in Milan web page: www.viennadesignweek.at/news.php?id=628

 

ELSEWHERE

Davide Groppi Chiostri dell’Umanitaria, Via S. Barnaba — Metro Crocetta (M3) or trams 12, 23 or 27 to Vittoria (Palazzo Giustizia) www.davidegroppi.com

This will be a fabulous display of wonderful, minimal lights in a series of cloisters – -magical at dusk!  Have a look at t the “ichiostri” web site (www.ichiostri.net) to see what I mean – not just a café but cloisters with gardens: “a location full of atmosphere of mystery”. Not just a lighting collection, but also a corner of Milan worth discovering.

Davide Groppi Via Medici 13 — Metro Crocetta (M3) or trams 2, 3 or 14 to Torino Carrobbio

…and here they will be displaying lighting that is particularly suited to restaurants.

Prandina Triennale — Metro Cadorna (M1, M2)  prandina.it

One of the best Italian lighting companies, at one of the most important design destinations in the world. The Triennale (recently remodelled internally by Michele De Lucchi) always has lots of interesting things happening during this design week – plus the bookshop and a great café with a large outside area by the park.

The Triennale’s web site: www.triennale.it

 

Tom Dixon MOST, Museo natzionale della Scienza e dalle Tecnologia, via Olona 6B — Metro Sant’Ambrogio (M2) www.tomdixon.net

Sander Mulder MOST www.sandermulder.com

Brokis MOST www.brokis.cz

Brokis is a particularly interesting new brand from the Czech Republic: very high quality glass working and very good, clever, witty designs. New introductions of theirs will also be shown at the Fair on the stand of Misuraemme (hall 7, stands G09 and H16).


Spazio Rossana Orlandi Via Matteo Bandello 14/16 — Metro Sant’Ambrogio (M2) or Conciliazione (M1) www.rossanaorlandi.com

Another essentuial venue where this year, amongst other things, Baroncelli will be showing Innovo, combining LEDs and bits of old chandeliers. www.baroncelli.com

Windfall Palazzo Durini, Via Santa Maria Valle 2 — Metro Missori (M3) www.windfall-gmbh.de

The single most important destination. Windfall creates the finest works in contemporary crystal in the world. You want to go there with your head to see what is possible. You want to go there with your heart to experience the thrill of crystal and light (plus beautiful people).


 

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Euroluce 2013: Hall 15, and some stands with lights in Salone Del Mobile halls

Euroluce name in colours

This is the fourth of a series of posts to be published this week that will build up into our Handy Guide to Euroluce 2013. This one looks at who is a hall fifteen, and in some of the Salone Del Mobile halls. Other posts look at who is in halls nine ,eleven and thirteen, and also what is happening where fuori salone. The last post in the series will pull all the content together into one document, with updates and corrections. This will then form the basis for our customary PDFs — alphabetical, and by hall — for you to use at the Fair. 

That last post in the series will remain up throughout the week of the Fair so that you can download the PDFs , or read it on your mobile thingy, at any time.

EUROLUCE MILAN 2013 – HALL 15 and OTHER HALLS

You will see that we are covering fewer exhibitors in this Handy Guide in Hall 15 than in the other Euroluce halls. This is because it houses mostly technical lighting (recessed downlighters).

Blackbody E31 www.blackbody-oled.com

The first person to use a new lighting technology is always Ingo Maurer, so he did the first OLED light (the Early Future table light). But the first company to base its entire business on OLEDs is Blackbody. Theirs is an essential stand to visit, therefore, if you want to see how OLEDs can be used in decorative lighting, what the light that they cast is like, and how much they cost…. We like Aldo Cibic’s Blossoms. And Rain.

Bocci C27 D20 www.bocci.ca

Omer will be introducing at the Fair his new 57 chandelier. It is made using a new hybrid glass blowing and fusing technique that is analogous to that used for producing open cell foam, apparently. From the video of their being made, they look interesting – and labour-intensive. It is hard to judge, though, how they will look in real life – which is why we all have to visit the stand!

Cini&Nils B22 www.cinienils.com

It is good that Cini&Nils are exhibiting at Euroluce: because they are based in Milan, they have not taken a stand in recent years. But their products do need to be seen, because this is an innovative company, creating lights for specific purposes, rather than following the herd. As a result, they have gone where no-one else has gone before, being the first company to do mains voltage track lighting (using cables), for example. They have now added a very useful outdoor version. The design of their lights follow their function. You’ll see that they are beautifully made, with wonderful detailing but, as you look at them, do consider their function. It is too easy to judge a luminaire solely by what it looks like (especially in a brightly lit hall) but that would be a huge mistake – on any decorative lighting stand.

Gubi C32 C36 www.gubi.com

Gubi continue to add classic 20th century designs to their already strong collection. From the secret preview, I can tell you that there is a task light that looks like evidence that two of their collections  – the BestLites and Greta Grossman’s – have mated. And there is the rerelease of a classic pendant that was last issued by Bald and Bang. More than that I should not say, but you will be glad that you visited the stand….

Il Fanale G36 www.ilfanale.com

And now for something completely different! Il Fanale is where you go to find the  traditional lights that you see in Italian trattorie and farm houses, elegantly made from iron, brass, copper, glass and ceramics. They even do the metal pipes and fittings that crawl over the walls of old buildings when the electric cables are not recessed. Continue reading

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Euroluce 2013: Hall 13


Euroluce name in colours

 

This is the third of a series of posts to be published this week that will build up into our Handy Guide to Euroluce 2013. This one looks at who is a hall thirteen. Other posts look at who is in other halls and also what is happening where fuori salone. The last post in the series will pull all the content together into one document, with updates and corrections. This will then form the basis for our customary PDFs — alphabetical, and by hall — for you to use at the Fair. 

That last post in the series will remain up throughout the week of the Fair so that you can download the PDFs , or read it on your mobile thingy, at any time.

EUROLUCE MILAN 2013 – HALL 13

Anglepoise E10 www.anglepoise.com

Anglepoise need no introduction from us. Last year they celebrated the 75th anniversary of the original 1227. We are so pleased that they have been able to bring this design back – the “anglepoise” – with its art deco base. See also the variation on this design – the Duo Table Lamp. There are also a Duo floor light and a Duo applique.

 Anna Lari F01 www.annalari.com

Besides their iconic tall lights with small adjustable shades in a variety of materials, Anna lari have got some other great designs in their collection.The latest are a series of table task lights powered by LEDs (Funky, Giorgia and Jazz) plus two appliques – Luna (a simple half-hemisphere) and Techno (a useful light that has a smallish lampshade hanging from an adjustable arm).

Catellani & Smith C10 www.catellanismith.com

The lightmaker’s lightmaker. Fabulous effects from a variety of materials, including gold and silver leaf used in his own way. Spectacular effects from simple pebbles of glass. Tiny, tiny LED light sources that do not interfere with the main design of the luminaire, even when positioned between the luminaire and the viewer.  An essential stand, in this case because you have to see for yourself that the real lights really do look as amazing in real life as they can in pictures! Continue reading

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Euroluce 2013: Hall 11

 

Euroluce name in colours

This is the second of a series of posts to be published this week that will build up into our Handy Guide to Euroluce 2013. This one looks at who is a hall eleven. Other posts look at who is in other halls and also what is happening where fuori salone. The last post in the series will pull all the content together into one document, with updates and corrections. This will then form the basis for our customary PDFs — alphabetical, and by hall — for you to use at the Fair. 

That last post in the series will remain up throughout the week of the Fair so that you can download the PDFs , or read it on your mobile thingy, at any time.

EUROLUCE MILAN 2013 – HALL 11

Album D21 E20 www.album.it

You MUST visit this stand, even if you visit no others! The reason is that Album’s systems make possible results that it would otherwise be very difficult to achieve. This includes getting the light source as near as possible to the thing being lit – essential if you are serious about saving energy. But it is never really clear what they can do until you have seen for yourself, when you will also discover how beautifully designed the lighting bodies are. When you add to these strengths the fact that they are one of the few decorative lighting companies using LEDs well, and that they now have an outdoor collection…well you can perhaps begin to understand why you should visit their stand!

Artemide C19 D28 www.artemide.com

One of the most important companies in decorative lighting, that manages to bring out very good, very interesting lights from top designers every year – for example, one of several innovative spot lights new to their catalogue is Cata, designed by Carlotta de Bevilacqua, that won this year’s prestigious IF Product Design award. This stand is, of course, a must.

Arturo Alvarez C35 www.arturo-alvarez.com

Arturo Alvarez will be introducing to their already strong offering new lights using LEDs and silicone, that are specifically designed with the hospitality and project markets in mind. With the world mired in the financial doldrums, this is a good approach. The designs need not be compromised by having to suit a particular market and/or function – quite the opposite.

Baga F27 F31 www.patriziagarganti.com

Patrizia Garganti has added several more brands to the original Baga – Lovelylight, Bespoke Lighting Design, ME, Atelier Tailor Made – and we saw some useful designs at their stand two years ago. But they never sent us the information that they had promised, so I suppose the message is caveat emptor.

Céline Wright D25 www.celinewright.com

We are so pleased Céline Wright will be showing at Euroluce! No-one makes lighter pieces than she does: floating shapes – large and small – from paper, often suspended from the most delicate structures, that may be complemented by the use of a pebble to provide weight. This year she has introduced her new Arabesque collection, that look a bit like the outline of a whirling Dervish! Continue reading

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Euroluce 2013: Hall 9

 

Euroluce name in colours

This is the first of a series of posts to be published this week that will build up into our Handy Guide to Euroluce 2013. This one looks at who is a hall nine. Other posts look at who is in other halls and also what is happening where fuori salone. The last post in the series will pull all the content together into one document, with updates and corrections. This will then form the basis for our customary PDFs — alphabetical, and by hall — for you to use at the Fair. 

That last post in the series will remain up throughout the week of the Fair so that you can download the PDFs , or read it on your mobile thingy, at any time.

EUROLUCE MILAN 2013 – HALL 9

AVMazzega G18 www.avmazzega.com

AVMazzega is a very good source of Venetian glass. Their lead times are good, their prices are good and their collections are interesting. They are also capable of carrying out the basic commercial procedures that are necessary if products are to be supplied for commercial projects. For example, they are on Architonic, so they are also in our LIGHT FINDER, meaning that their lights will be show up when you are searching for something. At the Fair, they will be showing the results of their latest tussles to get LEDs and Venetian glass to work together.

Almerich M08 www.almerich.com

Almerich have two collections, Classic Lighting and Furniture and Contemporary Lighting. Most of our readers will be more interested in the latter, that contains unusual, interesting and useful designs.

Axo Light B01 B03 www.axolight.it

Axo Light will have a big stand – 260 sq m. This is good because there should be plenty to see – maybe items from their outsize Lightecture collection, plus recent versions of the hugely successful Spillray, and Karim Rashid’s Nafir – recent winner of the Chicago Athenaeum’s Good Design award. It comprises a series of pendants, reminiscent of the bells of brass instruments, that flow into one another.

Stop press: amongst the new items in their Lightecture collection will be two modular designs (i.e. components that you can assemble into a large pattern of your own devising): Shatter (ceiling lights shaped like large fragments) and Framework (hollow square pendants that throw light upwards).

Banci Firenze F08 www.banci.it

Another company with a Classic and a Contemporary collection, that exploits the famous Florentine metal-working skills. Both contain some good designs – the Classic tend to be more floral and the Contemporary collection includes some pieces which are very light and airy – as if a lampshade has been drawn in space – and others which, whilst still highly decorative, have strong, quite simple structures.

Barovier & Toso E19 www.barovier.com

Where Barovier& Toso go first, others follow, so theirs is an essential stand to visit. The oldest company on Murano, yet still at the top of their game – new typologies, new colours, beautifully produced, but not new for new’s sake – they tend also to be very well suited for practical use in a wide variety of projects.

Bover A01 A05 www.bover.es

Actually, another essential stand, because Bover continue to produce excellent designs that are particularly well suited to contract (but by no means exclusively for contract). They are delight to work with, efficient, and their prices are good. See their growing collection of outdoor decorative lighting. Continue reading

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Woka’s new web site

Marc Lalique chandelier woka

We are delighted to see Woka‘s new web site. Not only does it provide full information on Woka’s own production, it also draws attention to the fact that they also restore classic pieces, which you can see at their fascinating showrooms in Vienna, near the cathedral, at Singerstraße 16 (not the whole building — just the part to the right of the entrance):

Singerstrasse 16

Here is the centre of their home page:

Woka home page central section

Roll over the Art Déco light (which is AD9) in the centre, and it changes to the text Classic Lamps from 1900 to the present handcrafted in Vienna. This is the section that interior designers will enter most often because it gives access to Woka’s standard catalogue items. A product page looks like this:

Woka AD10 table light

You get the info you need, plus a public price ex-VAT.

That “handcrafted in Vienna” strapline is important. Woka’s workshops are nearby…

Woka workshops 1

where there are craftsmen working at the highest level. Because they are also restoring classic pieces, their understanding of historic design and methods is constantly increasing. The quality of everything that Woka makes is of the highest, and priced accordingly.

Woka workshop 2

Woka was founded by WOlfgang KArolinsky, a collector of, and dealer in, works (not just lights) from the important art and craft movements in Vienna at the turn of the last century — the Viennese Secession and the Wiener Werkstätte. His knowledge and understanding of the period is very deep, not just from handling the pieces, but also from his extensive photographic archive.

In fact, our one criticism of the new site is that there are fewer images from this archive than there were on the old one. It is invaluable to see the originals in the spaces for which many of the Woka collection were designed. But also, sometimes those images conveyed essential information. For example, AD10, featured above, opens out like this:

Woka AD10 desk light on sideboard

which is why, besides being a very beautiful thing, it works so well as a desk light, or as a reading light if stood behind a chair on a surface of a suitable height.

Click on the Lobmeyr-like chandelier on the home page and you will find the selection of what is currently available. It changes, of course, as items are introduced and sold, but you will see not just very interesting works, like the Lalique at the top of this post, but also, for example, this…

Otto Wagner chandelier

…which is not just a chandelier by Otto Wagner, it is the chandelier that used to hang in the private dining room of the “Erste Villa Wagner” on the Hüttelbergstraße. The documentation that supports this attribution is listed, so €73,550 seems a small price to pay for such an important and striking historic piece.

Key buildings of the period have been important sources for specific items, such as the Palais Stoclet in Brussels, or the Sanatorium Purkersdorf. On the Projects page of the web site, these projects are explained and the items in the collection that derive from them are shown.

For example, this light, Dining 1

Dining1 pendant light Josef Hoffmann woka

…was designed by Josef Hoffmann in 1903 for the Santorium Purkersdorf. Here is one of the pictures of them in situ:

Sanatorium Purkersdorf

Elsewhere on the site, in the Design section, there is a profile of Josef Hoffmann, and of the other designers and movements represented in the Woka collection. The result is a site that, besides being the place to find info about the Woka standard collection, is also a significant academic source of detailed information about the period and the movements, informed by experience of the objects themselves.

It supports a collection that is unashamedly aimed at people who take a deep interest in art, design and the provenance of fine lighting, so Fine Lighting News likes it immensely!

Woka focuses on a period that many people are getting to know a lot better as a result of a recent run of important exhibitions in Vienna, notably Gustav Klimt/Josef Hoffmann — Pioneers of Modernism at the Belvedere, that featured a reconstruction of part of the Palais Stoclet, for which Woka re-issued a Hoffmann ceiling light. See our post about it here. The catalogue for this exhibition. and a monograph about Josef Hoffmann are available via our bookshop.

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The Sparks system by Daniel Becker for Quasar

Quasar Sparks system in a hall

Quasar will be showing in Milan their new Sparks system, designed for them by Daniel Becker. It is absolutely on trend, being a collection of components that can be plugged together to make installations of any size.

From the data sheet, you can see that only three shapes are needed….

Quasar Sparks data sheet

The connexion pieces have ball joints in order to maximize the range of possible angles. All the wiring is hidden and, since they plug into one another, only one electrical feed is required for most installations. Here is a close-up:

Quasar Sparks detail 1

Each module has to be attached to the wall or ceiling, of course.

So, what can you do with it? Continue reading

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Copper: Kin by Francesco Rota for Oluce

Oluce Kin 479 pendant light copper

Oluce have issued Kin, designed for them by Francesco Rota. One of the finish options is copper. The one in the image above is the larger size: Ø30cm (model #479). There is a also a smaller one at Ø15cm (model #478):

Oluce Kin 478 pendant light in copper

Other finishes include a black…

Oluce Kin 478 pendant light black

…and also a white, here demonstrating that if one is good, two are better…

Oluce Kin 479 pendant light white pair

…and, if you can, why not three? Or, what the heck, four!

Oluce Kin 478 pendant light four in a row

The light sources are a very efficient new generation of LED that runs on mains voltage (so no driver has to be accommodated) and is dimmable — a 4W ( 320 lm) in the 478 and a 12W (940 lm) in the 479. Enough for a sun tan. Actually, though photometric tables are rare for decorative luminaires, Oluce do them for Kin:

Oluce Kin 479 photometric

The diffuser (more obvious in the smaller 278) is plexiglas.

Custom arrangements are possible, as are and special versions — e.g. other colours, such as red:

Oluce Kin red installation

The result is very versatile, elegant, reasonably priced pendant, in two sizes and with a good light source.

Oluce Kin pendant light group

 

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Light Show at London’s Hayward Gallery

Leo Villareal Cylinder II Light Show hayward gallery

Seldom have different episodes of this reviewer’s life been brought into such brutal conjunction as by a recent visit to the Light Show at London’s Hayward Gallery.

When training to be an art historian, if the artwork was deemed worthy of consideration (by no means a given), much time and thought was devoted to it. Its value was determined by its context: its relevance to the development of an art movement, or to the artist’s career, or to the political perspective of the Feminist or the Marxist,  of the Structuralist or the Freudian. This did not worry me: as a liberal empiricist, I put the artwork, and my reaction to it, at the centre: the analyses provided by the various political approaches were all grist to my mill.

Things were different at the Arts Council of Great Britain, however. There, each art form took a different approach. The Art Department’s was the most extreme: it was assumed that no-one who was not professionally involved in contemporary art could possibly have any interest in, or anything interesting to say about, any artwork. The trouble was that we were allocating public money to the arts, and some interest in the reactions of visitors to funded exhibitions seemed to me to be literally  essential.

The average visitor should not have to be so deeply knowledgeable about in the context of each artwork exhibited. And, once you strip away the context, there can be alarming instances of the emperor’s new clothes, that are picked on by the media with ill-disguised glee (Carl Andre’s bricks at the Tate, for example) in order to ridicule the arts in general.

Many years later, at Cameron Peters Fine Lighting,  we are selling lights – works by the very finest architects and designers of the 20th century, some made by the very finest craftspeople. But the objects that they design and make have to survive with no context: specifiers and their clients have no interest in who designed something or who made something, and they don’t see any reason why the objects should be accorded respect or time. The light maker is therefore in the same position as the busker, who may be playing in a concert hall one evening (with all the cultural focus that the venue generates) and on a street the next (as all classical musician students are encouraged to do), where the members of the public are trotting by. If, as they trot, they find what they hear interesting, it is because of the intrinsic characteristics of the work being played, not because of its context.

Why is this relevant to the Light Show? Because quite a large space was carved out of the Hayward Gallery to create a dark room in which a naked lamp could be hung, quite near the floor (Katie Paterson’s Light Bulb to Simulate Moonlight of 2008)…. Continue reading

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Copper: Sven Ivar Dysthe’s Butterfly from Northern Lighting

Northern Lighting Butterfly wall light  copper

In 1964, Sven Ivar Dysthe designed a wall light called Butterfly. Arguably the leading figure in contemporary Norwegian design, he is respected for “…his ability to find simple solutions to complex challenges with decisive elegance”. (A bit like me, really.)  Butterfly is an excellent example of this:

Sven Ivar Dysthe Butterfly wall light

It was originally made by Høvik Lys, and later by Arnold Vik, Norway. Northern Lighting relaunched the design in 2008.

They have now produced a version in copper which is heat treated, so each one will have a unique surface colour and material structure. Added to which, oxidization will further change their appearance, making each one more more individual — almost a living thing:

Northern Lighting Butterfly wall light copper close up

Northern Lighting describe Butterfly well: Continue reading

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